ToPCaP

Spartacus- Steps for Prostate Cancer Health and Survival

Spartacus- Steps for Prostate Cancer Health and Survival

Spartacus (Steps for Prostate Cancer Health and Survival) aims to improve prostate cancer-specific survival rates while also addressing concomitant health issues that are routinely linked to prostate cancer patients, such as cardiovascular disease, quality of life and emotional well-being, many of which have the potential to be more life threatening than the underlying prostate cancer itself. SPaRTACuS is designed to test the idea that a physical activity intervention began shortly after the diagnosis of prostate cancer, specifically men walking in groups, can significantly improve cancer survival rates and overall health of prostate cancer patients. The results from this large-scale intervention study will be readily translatable to the clinical care of prostate cancer patients by providing high-quality data about the benefits of a simple walking intervention initiated after diagnosis. The results from this project could immediately influence the clinical course of men with prostate cancer, as well as improve the global health of patients. Plus, insights produced by this project will help elucidate key systemic pathways that explain the association between physical activity and improved cancer outcomes, potentially providing information to support additional chemopreventive agents or targeted therapy. By establishing a longitudinal serum repository, this project will allow future studies to identify novel biomarkers for prostate cancer progression.

A pilot study was completed in Sweden in 2012, which further confirmed that this group walking intervention might have a major effect on quality of life and survival.

Currently, the ToPCaP team is advancing this research under the auspices of the Dimbleby Cancer Care Marianne Bjerke Blake Research Award, which provided funding for a feasibility study in the UK. In addition, the team was just recently funded by the World Cancer Research Fund International, for a grant titled "Evasion of immune editing by circulating tumour cells is an exercise-modifiable mechanism underlying aggressive behaviour in obese men with prostate cancer."