ToPCaP

Infection and inflammation in prostate cancer

Infection and inflammation in prostate cancer

Approximately 20 % of all human cancers are assumed to be a result from infection and chronic inflammation and a classical example of an inflammatory-induced malignancy are e.g. gastric cancer caused by Helicobacter pylori infections. Inflammation is also commonly found in the prostate gland and it has recently been suggested that infection and chronic inflammation could play a role in prostate carcinogenesis as well. In most cases, the cause of the prostatic inflammation is unclear, but it cannot exclusively be explained as an anti-tumor immune response since it is scattered throughout the entire organ. Many different pathogenic microorganisms have been reported to be able to infect and induce an inflammatory response in the prostate. One such pathogen is Propionibacterium acnes, which have been described as the most prevalent microorganism in prostate samples from both benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate tumors.

Our studies focus on the effect of a P. acnes infection and a subsequent chronic inflammation when it comes to initiation and progression of prostate cancer.